Restoring Lives Through Transplantion

In an age where medical treatments and procedures are constantly evolving and physician–scientists are continuously challenging the boundaries of healthcare, it takes something incredible—a true medical milestone—to capture and hold the world's attention. But doctors at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) have done just that, pioneering a new surgical frontier that is giving patients a second chance at the lives they once knew.
In an age where medical treatments and procedures are constantly evolving and physician–scientists are continuously challenging the boundaries of healthcare, it takes something incredible—a true medical milestone—to capture and hold the world's attention. But doctors at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) have done just that, pioneering a new surgical frontier that is giving patients a second chance at the lives they once knew.

 

The Center for Restorative Surgery

BWH is seeking to leverage this incredible expertise by establishing the Center for Restorative Surgery, which, by harnessing our current momentum, promises to unlock the full potential of this burgeoning field and transform the lives of so many more patients.


Making Medical History

For some people whose faces have been severely injured or who have lost their arms and/or legs, conventional plastic surgery offers limited help, leaving them physically and psychologically devastated. In recent years, however, physicians at BWH have begun exploring the use of innovative procedures designed to restore, rather than reconstruct, patients’ missing or damaged body parts. Known as restorative surgery, these complex and intricate surgeries involve using human donor tissue to not only create a natural outward appearance for the patient, but also restore the anatomy and function of their missing limbs or disfigured face.

In recent years, BWH has emerged as a leader and pioneer in this new field. Under the leadership of plastic surgeon Bohdan Pomahac, MD, a powerhouse team of surgeons, nurses, anesthesiologists, trainees, and other clinicians at BWH have performed six face transplants as well as double-hand transplants, and are currently evaluating candidates for lower limb transplantations.

The new BWH Center for Restorative Surgery will intensify and expand our research efforts in this realm. As we seek to launch this enterprise, the support of philanthropically minded individuals—individuals who believe that the revolutionary treatments of tomorrow begin with the research discoveries of today—will be essential to turning Dr. Pomahac’s vision into a reality: giving patients who have endured unimaginable trauma and suffering their lives back through surgical restoration.

For more information, please contact Senior Director of Development Sue Andrews at 617-424-4349 or sjandrews@partners.org.